Behavioural Design Lab Subscribe Bird Contact
«
»

Behavioural design: helping people help themselves

Design-thinking
Crawley ECO leaflet section

“Did I just use behavioural science? But I’m not a designer!”

So said a dozen or so stakeholders of a project aimed at retrofitting 160 draughty homes in Crawley, West Sussex. With good reason. They had co-produced a wide-ranging set of design and communication ideas for the project.

The project offers work such as external wall cladding, funded by the Energy Companies Obligation, through which the Government is obliging utilities to fund energy efficiency work on Britain’s coldest, draughtiest and most energy inefficient homes. The problem many have found is that, in the absence of existing demand (that is, people who are aware that they want their home retrofitted but haven’t been able to do it yet), building demand for something free is tricky. Price perception tells us that if something is free, it doesn’t have value. Homo economimus might see free cladding as a no-brainer; real people don’t.

So, when introducing the opportunity to people, we decided to frame the choice as being between a cold home and a warm home – not as the chance to choose a named process or product. And we avoided terms (such as ‘retrofitting’), known by professionals but which may provide a barrier if not familiar to residents.

Adding the use of behavioural insights to the team’s existing expertise in community engagement had a major impact immediately, speeding up recruitment 4-fold, compared with similar projects being undertaken elsewhere in the South East.

Another innovation is that, when people say ‘yes’ to a warmer home, this becomes the default setting. So, instead of initially agreeing to an “assessment” which leads to another choice once the surveyor has visited, householders make a single choice: the surveyor will make a recommendation of the measures to adopt “ … unless you drop out”. From a project management viewpoint, we’re moving from a process whose success depends on people saying ‘yes’ at several different stages to a process designed to support and prove people’s positive choice to have a warmer home.

There are a dozen other ways in which we are using – or plan to use – behavioural insights. Rob Bennett, who leads the community engagement team, says, “It is really important that we find ways to encourage communities as a whole to get behind these initiatives, So whether it’s the initial decision to participate in a scheme, or ensuring that residents communicate what works best by sharing good practice and experiences – we expect behavioural evidence to play a critical part in successful ”delivery”.

We think we’ve learned what the With The Grain tool has also demonstrated in other settings: that behavioural insights are accessible and usable; that these insights help make approaches more people-centric and therefore more efficient; and that it’s possible to get away from the default setting of trying to persuade people.

So we now have a platform for using behavioural insights in the future. And we have a group of stakeholders who are comfortable with knowingly using behavioural insights to affect the context within which people make decisions.

In the future, this won’t be unusual. Right now, it feels revolutionary.


Warren Hatter is a former Design Council associate who devised With The Grain, a tool which enables local government and public health staff to use insights from behavioural sciences.

Rob Bennett is an experienced regeneration exponent and a Director of E3, a not for profit company that is currently working with a range of public sector authorities and utility companies, to roll out low carbon initiatives for the benefit of communities and to stimulate local economic growth.

This post has 5 comments

  1. […] goals, with a particular focus on social development and urban development. For instance, take this innovative project aimed at retrofitting draughty and energy inefficient homes in Crawley, West Sussex, with the aid […]

  2. […] “Did I just use behavioural science? But I’m not a designer!” […]

  3. […] ambition of the collaborative project between Warwick Business School and Honeywell Building Solutions is to reduce the energy consumption of organisations by applying a combination of relevant […]

  4. […] goals, with a particular focus on social development and urban development. For instance, take this innovative project aimed at retrofitting draughty and energy inefficient homes in Crawley, West Sussex, with the aid […]

  5. […] with the grain of human nature. That can be helping people becoming homeless find their own home, helping people adopt energy efficiency measures (giving away free retrofitting is tough, because ‘free’ suggests ‘valueless’), helping […]

What do you think? Leave a comment

© 2014 Warwick Business School and the Design Council